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Kaden
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 Posted: Fri Feb 25th, 2011 03:10 am

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Adrift wrote: But yeah, its sort of freeing not being tied to cable, isn't it.
It is. I don't have to see another reality show ever again, even in passing. That makes me so happy! :c030a:



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 Posted: Fri Feb 25th, 2011 03:26 am

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Kaden wrote:
Adrift wrote:
It is. I don't have to see another reality show ever again, even in passing. That makes me so happy! :c030a:


LOL, you know what's funny to me is that I started to notice how much crap Ill watch if its just "on". Not because I want to watch it, but because it happens to be on the channel I flicked it too. How horrible is that? Its like having Stockholm Syndrome or something. You just get used to it being there, and after awhile you fool yourself into thinking you like it. The hardest thing for me to do is actually find something I want to intentionally watch now on Netflix and Hulu. I mean, there's a lot of content there, but do I really want to watch... I don't know... Swamp Loggers? No, I don't.

The other thing that gets me, is, I'm not a sports fan at all, and during Superbowl Sunday, people were looking forward to the commercials. I saw a Hulu commercial for the Superbowl commercials! I thought to myself... "wow, people are actually looking forward to a sales pitch!" I just couldn't believe it. I don't miss commercials at all.

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 Posted: Fri Feb 25th, 2011 03:30 am

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I concur. :D I find that actually having to search for things to watch makes my choices much more thoughtful.



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Abby1964
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 Posted: Fri Feb 25th, 2011 03:36 am

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Adrift wrote:
Abby1964 wrote:
I stopped watching TV when I quit the Police department. I average maybe 3 hours per week. I'm much happier watching some older less than popular out there sci-fi flick like Repo Man or THX-1138.

Well, films to me are a different beast altogether. A tv series is an investment in time because you get so caught up in it, but a film is something you can plop down and get through with a bucket of popcorn. My problem with sci-fi film is that I've seen EVERYTHING. I'm literally scraping the B-list bottom of the sci-fi and fantasy bucket on Netflix. My only reprieve comes with the occasional foreign film that finally finds its way here, but even that's getting rare.


Exactly why I prefer a film, most TV shows are not worth the investment. And yes the barrel scraping is going on across the board. I've been looking east for my horror for a while now. I can deal with most of the Pang brothers films but I still love the one that turned me on to the Asian horror, Ju-on (The Grudge 1 & 2) in the US. My DVD is almost worn out.



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 Posted: Fri Feb 25th, 2011 03:41 am

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I never saw the original, but The Grudge seemed like perhaps the slowest movie ever. I kept waiting for something to happen and it never did.



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 Posted: Fri Feb 25th, 2011 03:47 am

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I loved it but when it was remade they split it into two movies Grudge 1 and 2. Sam Rami wanted to make the story chronologically linear. While he stayed pretty faithful to each section (Even going so far as to film in the exact same location), he put a lot of filler to lead the audience from point A to Point B.

Ju-on is not a Point A to B film, It jumps to M then backs up to F. Rami didn't think that western audiences would appreciate being dragged around like that.



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 Posted: Sat Feb 26th, 2011 12:14 am

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Abby1964 wrote:
Exactly why I prefer a film, most TV shows are not worth the investment.

Yeah, I agree with that sentiment for the most part. There have been exceptions, but typically series don't get much better than the first season. I assume that's because the creators don't seem to have any long term plot concepts beyond a first season.... Most are probably just happy to get their projects off the ground in the first place.

And yes the barrel scraping is going on across the board. I've been looking east for my horror for a while now. I can deal with most of the Pang brothers films but I still love the one that turned me on to the Asian horror, Ju-on (The Grudge 1 & 2) in the US. My DVD is almost worn out.

I saw both American Grudge films and I have to admit to being underwhelmed, and I've only seen the American version of Bangkok Dangerous which is barely worth mentioning. I've seen a lot of Asian films, and though many of them have innovative themes, I simply have a hard time connecting to them because quite a bit of Asian cinema seems to take Western concepts and influence and retranslates it for an Eastern audience. Had a lot of Asian film been created in the West originally, I'd probably write quite a bit it off as sensationalistic, silly, or cheesy. Its only because they're foreign that it seems that a lot of people give them the time of day. What annoys me about quite a bit of Asian cinema is the emotional, I don't know... dissonance? of primary players. I'm certain this is a cultural issue rather than lack of creative talent. These films originate in mostly collectivist type cultures where passion and romance are manifested in ways that seem detached to me, and as a Westerner I have a hard time empathizing with characters in Asian films. This is not always true, and I suppose if I thought hard enough I could come up with a handful of films where this doesn't seem to be the case, but for the most part this is how I feel when watching them. I don't fault anyone for this, its simply something lost in translation.

Lately I've been watching a lot of Scandinavian and German films. I also appreciate a lot of French films. I haven't seen many decent modern Italian films though they were major innovators during the 60s and 70s. I also appreciate the occasional English and Spanish film, but these seem far and few between anymore. Russia pops a good one out now and then. I'm not a fan of Bollywood song and dance type stuff which seems to be the majority of what's coming out of India. South Korea's output is impressive, and I'm always impressed how so much of it out rivals some of the best out of Hong Kong and Japan.

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 Posted: Sat Feb 26th, 2011 01:27 am

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Adrift wrote: I saw both American Grudge films and I have to admit to being underwhelmed, and I've only seen the American version of Bangkok Dangerous which is barely worth mentioning. I've seen a lot of Asian films, and though many of them have innovative themes, I simply have a hard time connecting to them because quite a bit of Asian cinema seems to take Western concepts and influence and retranslates it for an Eastern audience. Had a lot of Asian film been created in the West originally, I'd probably write quite a bit it off as sensationalistic, silly, or cheesy. Its only because they're foreign that it seems that a lot of people give them the time of day. What annoys me about quite a bit of Asian cinema is the emotional, I don't know... dissonance? of primary players. I'm certain this is a cultural issue rather than lack of creative talent. These films originate in mostly collectivist type cultures where passion and romance are manifested in ways that seem detached to me, and as a Westerner I have a hard time empathizing with characters in Asian films. This is not always true, and I suppose if I thought hard enough I could come up with a handful of films where this doesn't seem to be the case, but for the most part this is how I feel when watching them. I don't fault anyone for this, its simply something lost in translation.

Wow, very well put. Your observations make a lot of sense. I feel a disconnection to a lot of Asian films but couldn't really explain why. There are very few I have really liked (mainly old Kurosawa films), but there was a short film that I enjoyed called The Hand. It's in an anthology called Eros. Unfortunately the rest of the anthology is bland, but I found The Hand very romantic and moving in a strange, quiet way. It was very subdued yet deeply emotional, which I have not seen very often in Asian films.

I love foreign films. It's fascinating to see the different ways a subject can be dealt with. Where one culture might focus on the cerebral, another might focus on the sensual or the emotional. It's interesting. You can see films that basically deal with the same subjects and yet they're executed in vastly different ways.

I tend to gravitate towards smaller, independent films where the filmmakers get to tell the stories the way they want to instead of the way that will appeal to the broadest audience. Don't get me wrong, big budget blockbusters and be a lot of fun (though usually they blow :P) but I generally prefer something with deeper meaning.



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 Posted: Sat Feb 26th, 2011 02:32 am

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Kaden wrote:
Wow, very well put. Your observations make a lot of sense. I feel a disconnection to a lot of Asian films but couldn't really explain why. There are very few I have really liked (mainly old Kurosawa films)

Thank you. I think its important to know why or explain why you don't appreciate something on the level that someone else does. Its not enough to say "well that sucked". I can live with someone telling me what I enjoy sucks, as long as they give me a reason for why they think it sucks. And I'm not saying I think Asian cinema sucks, far from it, I just realize that I'm not typically the target audience. Kurosawa is something else though. His films evoke a timeless sense of honor and duty that I suppose is lost on the West, yet we can still identify with it based on handed down tales of chivalry. Also a lot of the reason we can identify with his films is because American cinema ripped him off and retranslated his films for Western audiences. Maybe that's what Raimi was trying to accomplish with the Grudge... ?

but there was a short film that I enjoyed called The Hand. It's in an anthology called Eros. Unfortunately the rest of the anthology is bland, but I found The Hand very romantic and moving in a strange, quiet way. It was very subdued yet deeply emotional, which I have not seen very often in Asian films.

Hmm... I'll have to see if I can find that someplace. On the total opposite end of the spectrum, I really dig Tetsuo the Iron Man because of its surrealistic nature. Maybe I only like it because it reminds me of some weird cross between Eraserhead and Stalker. I also find Takashi Miike films fascinating. I don't know that I like his films... its more like I study his films when I watch them. They're often so detached from anything I can identify with that its just captivating to see how someone can think that way.

I love foreign films. It's fascinating to see the different ways a subject can be dealt with. Where one culture might focus on the cerebral, another might focus on the sensual or the emotional. It's interesting. You can see films that basically deal with the same subjects and yet they're executed in vastly different ways.

You're so right about that. I hate to think what other nationalities think of America based on our blockbusters. :D

I tend to gravitate towards smaller, independent films where the filmmakers get to tell the stories the way they want to instead of the way that will appeal to the broadest audience. Don't get me wrong, big budget blockbusters and be a lot of fun (though usually they blow :P) but I generally prefer something with deeper meaning.

It took me a long time to relax and just enjoy a big dumb blockbuster for what it is. When I read critics like Roger Ebert, I imagine he's probably done the same thing in his career, otherwise you become hypercritical about everything. Ultimately I do lean towards films that have substance over spectacle. I think though, that a lot of indie films think they're smarter than they really are. That can be an issue for me. I enjoy films by directors like David Lynch because I think he realizes that in order to draw the audience in you still have to catch their eye with something.

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 Posted: Sat Feb 26th, 2011 03:30 am

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Adrift wrote: I also find Takashi Miike films fascinating. I don't know that I like his films... its more like I study his films when I watch them. They're often so detached from anything I can identify with that its just captivating to see how someone can think that way.


Interest piqued. :) I'll have to check those out.

It took me a long time to relax and just enjoy a big dumb blockbuster for what it is. When I read critics like Roger Ebert, I imagine he's probably done the same thing in his career, otherwise you become hypercritical about everything. Ultimately I do lean towards films that have substance over spectacle. I think though, that a lot of indie films think they're smarter than they really are. That can be an issue for me. I enjoy films by directors like David Lynch because I think he realizes that in order to draw the audience in you still have to catch their eye with something.

Good point. It can be a real turn-off when something, or someone, takes themselves too seriously. I suppose what I meant is that I like it when a filmmaker has the ability or freedom to be honest. Without being too self-important, of course. :c030a:

Sometimes my brain needs a break though. Then I just want to look at something pretty and silly.

:bounce_pinka:




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 Posted: Sat Feb 26th, 2011 03:59 am

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I spent a year in Korea and got into a few Asian horror movies at the time. The culture is more reserved and yet more open at the same time. It's nothing to see two guys walking sown the street holding hands (It almost like two female teen BFF's it not a sexual thing) but on The other hand you won't see much 'affection shown between the sexes. So you are right it probably is a culture thing. Now for me American movies annoy me in that no story can be told without 'sex'. No matter the situation or the plot there's going to be sex, that is missing in most Asian films it seems that more energy is focused on the story instead of using the plot as a background for 'sex' part of the story



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 Posted: Sat Feb 26th, 2011 04:35 am

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I have mixed feelings about sex in films. I have no problem with it if it helps move the narrative along. But when it's gratuitous... bleh. On the other hand, it bugs me when the subject matter calls for it and the director or actors shy away from it. Too much or not enough can hurt the quality of a film. A good example is the Oliver Stone film Alexander. The main character was supposed to be bi-sexual. He and his lover have this moment in the camp before they're about to go into battle where they declare their love for each other. And then they hug. Platonically. Zero chemistry, zero heat. If that moment had been between a man and woman they would have kissed passionately. To me, it looked like the actors were afraid to commit to the moment. That vexed me to no end. Don't make a film about diverse sexuality if you're afraid of the content. Terrible film. One of the worst I've ever seen.



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 Posted: Sat Feb 26th, 2011 05:06 am

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Abby1964 wrote: I spent a year in Korea and got into a few Asian horror movies at the time. The culture is more reserved and yet more open at the same time. It's nothing to see two guys walking sown the street holding hands (It almost like two female teen BFF's it not a sexual thing) but on The other hand you won't see much 'affection shown between the sexes. So you are right it probably is a culture thing. Now for me American movies annoy me in that no story can be told without 'sex'. No matter the situation or the plot there's going to be sex, that is missing in most Asian films it seems that more energy is focused on the story instead of using the plot as a background for 'sex' part of the story

Both myself and Cesare here on this board are HUGE Asian film fans, especially HK, Japanese and Korean flicks. Cesare has posted some amazing pics of the old-school HK stars on the 'Hot Hunks' thread over the past couple of years, amazing stuff.

Personally I'm a fan of the sword and sorcery type Asian film, but I also go for the 'Heroic Bloodshed' type of gangster flick and the action films. In the HK movies, there's alot of sex infused with action, more over the top than even the US films, they really knew how to push the boundaries. The Koreans know how to make a good horror film, since their perspective is so close to the Japanese, who are masters of good horror. I'm also a fan of the cyber-punk genre that Adrift was talking about, in Tetsuo Body Hammer, Pinocchio 964 and others.

If you want to see some truly bizarre horror, watch Thai movies, they are demented. One in particular is 'Boxers Omen', and you have to see it to beleive it.

 



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 Posted: Sat Feb 26th, 2011 06:28 am

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Abby1964 wrote:
I spent a year in Korea and got into a few Asian horror movies at the time. The culture is more reserved and yet more open at the same time. It's nothing to see two guys walking sown the street holding hands (It almost like two female teen BFF's it not a sexual thing) but on The other hand you won't see much 'affection shown between the sexes. So you are right it probably is a culture thing. Now for me American movies annoy me in that no story can be told without 'sex'. No matter the situation or the plot there's going to be sex, that is missing in most Asian films it seems that more energy is focused on the story instead of using the plot as a background for 'sex' part of the story

Why were you in Korea? Were you stationed there in the military? Because I had a similar experience in the Airforce in Germany. Adult females often have no problem holding hands as they're walking about. Odd how Americans are so touchy feely, yet we get stranged out by things like that. Germans seem very reserved when it comes to newcomers, yet once they know you, you're like family.

Last edited on Sat Feb 26th, 2011 06:29 am by Adrift

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 Posted: Sat Feb 26th, 2011 06:40 am

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Kaden wrote:
I have mixed feelings about sex in films. I have no problem with it if it helps move the narrative along. But when it's gratuitous... bleh. On the other hand, it bugs me when the subject matter calls for it and the director or actors shy away from it. Too much or not enough can hurt the quality of a film. A good example is the Oliver Stone film Alexander. The main character was supposed to be bi-sexual. He and his lover have this moment in the camp before they're about to go into battle where they declare their love for each other. And then they hug. Platonically. Zero chemistry, zero heat. If that moment had been between a man and woman they would have kissed passionately. To me, it looked like the actors were afraid to commit to the moment. That vexed me to no end. Don't make a film about diverse sexuality if you're afraid of the content. Terrible film. One of the worst I've ever seen.

I have to admit getting slightly uncomfortable about explicit love scenes, only because I empathize with the actors so strongly. If it doesn't feel genuine I second think my suspension of disbelief. Mostly it doesn't concern me too much, but there's a new crop of films like The Brown Bunny which features non-simulated sexual content that disturbs me on a level that I don't think film needs to go to. How far away from that sort of thing do we need to go before we get into non-simulated violence? There's a line that I think crosses between fiction and reality that maybe only documentary needs to cross. Its bad enough that people watch their local news and in their heads believe that they're detached just because its on TV. There's a potential danger there that I'm not comfortable with.


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