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mayaXXX
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 Posted: Tue Jun 12th, 2007 12:09 am

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So what's a swede anyway? A sweet potato? :c030a:



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Angel
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 Posted: Tue Jun 12th, 2007 06:56 am

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mayaXXX wrote: So what's a swede anyway? A sweet potato? :c030a:

There's alot of swedes's here, but I don't think I want to eat them. :wink3:

What exactly is a swede, DFG?



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Dragonflygurl
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 Posted: Tue Jun 12th, 2007 08:13 am

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Angel wrote: mayaXXX wrote: So what's a swede anyway? A sweet potato? :c030a:

There's alot of swedes's here, but I don't think I want to eat them. :wink3:

What exactly is a swede, DFG?







Swede



With its creamy-purple skin and rounded shape swede is a popular root vegetable. It has an attractive pale orange-yellow coloured flesh with a bittersweet, mustardy flavour. Swedes are the traditional accompaniment to haggis which is eaten in Scotland on Burns night where they are known as neeps. Over-sized swedes tend to be woody and tough so choose smaller swedes, with smooth skin if possible. Avoid any that have damaged or blemished skin.







Swede is served cooked. Swede can be served mashed or boiled as a side dish or added to winter stews and casseroles. It can also be roasted in fat around a joint of meat.







Scrub and peel swede thickly to remove any tough skin and roots. Wash and cut into even-sized chunks.







Swede can be boiled or steamed. To boil, bring a pan of water to the boil and add the chunks of swede, cook for 15-20 minutes or until tender. To steam, place the prepared chunks in a steamer and cook for 20-25 minutes. Serve the cooked swede chunks as pieces or mash with butter, black pepper and a little nutmeg or horseradish.







Keep in the fridge for up to 1 week.


 

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 Posted: Tue Jun 12th, 2007 09:39 am

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TURNIP



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 Posted: Tue Jun 12th, 2007 01:53 pm

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Ketana wrote: TURNIP







Turnips



Turnips have a subtle peppery flavour and a purple or green tinged creamy white skin. Baby turnips have particularly tender flesh with a sweetish, delicate flavour. Choose turnips that have smooth, unbruised skins and feel heavy for their size.







Turnip can be served as an accompanying vegetable or included in stews. They can also be made into soup, mashed or puréed. Mini turnips are served raw or cooked. Grate raw mini turnips and include in salads or slice thinly and drizzle with French dressing or mayonnaise.







Peel and wash turnips and cut into even-sized pieces. Mini turnips do not need peeling before cooking, simply wash and trim the tops if cooking whole. Alternatively, cut into even-sized pieces before cooking.







Turnip can be boiled or steamed. To boil or steam, cook for 15-20 minutes or until tender. Mini turnips can be boiled whole or chopped and steamed or roasted. To boil, bring a pan of water to the boil and cook whole mini turnips for 20-30 minutes or until tender. Coat in melted butter or cheese sauce to serve. To roast chopped turnip, preheat the oven to 200C, gas mark 6. Par-boil prepared turnips chunks for 5 minutes in boiling salted water. Add 150 ml olive oil to a roasting tin and preheat in the oven for 5 minutes. Add the drained turnip to the tin and coat in the oil. Roast for 30-45 minutes, basting occasionally with the oil, until crunchy and golden brown.









Keep in a cool, dry, dark place for up to 1 week.

Dragonflygurl
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 Posted: Tue Jun 12th, 2007 01:54 pm

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want know any other vegatable?!

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 Posted: Tue Jun 12th, 2007 01:55 pm

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How about radishes?  I used to make a radish and butter sandwich as a kid, it was good actually.



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Dragonflygurl
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 Posted: Tue Jun 12th, 2007 01:57 pm

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Angel wrote: How about radishes?  I used to make a radish and butter sandwich as a kid, it was good actually.

Now your taking the piss, lol

I'd say a Radish is more of  salad item then a vegatable.



Radish is a cool-season, fast-maturing, easy-to-grow vegetable. Garden radishes can be grown wherever there is sun and moist, fertile soil, even on the smallest city lot. Early varieties usually grow best in the cool days of early spring, but some later-maturing varieties can be planted for summer use. The variety French Breakfast holds up and grows better than most early types in summer heat if water is supplied regularly. Additional sowings of spring types can begin in late summer, to mature in the cooler, more moist days of fall. Winter radishes are sown in midsummer to late summer, much as fall turnips. They are slower to develop than spring radishes; and they grow considerably larger, remain crisp longer, are usually more pungent and hold in the ground or store longer than spring varieties.

Last edited on Tue Jun 12th, 2007 02:09 pm by Dragonflygurl

Angel
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 Posted: Tue Jun 12th, 2007 02:57 pm

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I'm not kidding, DFG.  My Dad used to eat radish and butter sandwiches, and I quite liked them growing up. :D



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 Posted: Tue Jun 12th, 2007 03:14 pm

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Dragonflygurl wrote: Angel wrote: How about radishes?  I used to make a radish and butter sandwich as a kid, it was good actually.

Now your taking the piss, lol

I'd say a Radish is more of  salad item then a vegatable.


But radishes have after effects....BEEEEEELCH:fear2:



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 Posted: Wed Jun 13th, 2007 10:58 am

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Here's one of my favorite veggie's, and for some odd reason they are known as Ladies Fingers.  Very good if you can't poo, as they are a good natural laxtive.







Okra



Originally from Africa and also very popular in Indian, Caribbean and Middle Eastern cookery, okra are also known as 'ladies' fingers'. They are narrow green-skinned ribbed pods that contain rows of edible creamy seeds that ooze a viscous liquid when cooked. They have a mild-bean like flavour when cooked. Look for firm, small green pods (a brownish tinge indicates they are stale) no longer than 8 cm and avoid any that appear shrivelled or feel soft when gently squeezed.







Okra is served cooked. It is included in a variety of savoury dishes including curries, vegetable stews and soups where the viscous liquid acts as a natural thickener. Okra is an essential ingredient in gumbo a hearty, spicy chicken and prawn stew from New Orleans.







Top and tail the pods and if the skin appears to be damaged in any way, scrape it with a small, sharp knife. Leave whole or slice.







Okra can be boiled or fried but is best cooked with other ingredients. To boil, bring a pan of water to the boil, add the prepared okra and cook for 4-6 minutes or until tender. To fry, heat 1 tbsp olive oil in a frying pan and sauté the prepared okra for 5-10 minutes or until tender. For added flavour fry the okra with garlic and onion, cumin and turmeric.







Keep in the fridge for up to 3 days.

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 Posted: Wed Jun 13th, 2007 04:41 pm

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Oooh, I love these. They call them bhindi in the Indian restaurants here & serve them in a dish called bhindi bhaji, yum.  They are also an Asian medicinal plant used for curing ulcers, because they are quite slimy - not to everyone's taste, they make some people shudder!

( re the swede/turnip discussion - whats a rutabaga, then? ( and how on earth do you pronounce it? ))

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 Posted: Wed Jun 13th, 2007 04:49 pm

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jerhume wrote: Oooh, I love these. They call them bhindi in the Indian restaurants here & serve them in a dish called bhindi bhaji, yum.  They are also an Asian medicinal plant used for curing ulcers, because they are quite slimy - not to everyone's taste, they make some people shudder!

( re the swede/turnip discussion - whats a rutabaga, then? ( and how on earth do you pronounce it? ))


Yeah I always order Bhindi Bhaji too but that's only the name of the dish not another name for Okra.  My mum came from the Trinidan and it's used a lot in their dishes.  She used to cook it just in water and then squeeze lemon juice on it.  I never used to like them becasue of the slim.  Interest fact about the Ulcers, I never knew that.  I wish it would cure a henia I have.

I don't know what a Rutabaga is, never heard of it.  Perhaps you should look it up at google.

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 Posted: Thu Jun 14th, 2007 02:04 pm

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Baby Plum Tomato, Asparagus, King Prawn and Rocket Salad with a Lemon and Honey Dressing



This delicious combination makes a lovely colourful summer salad which is simple to prepare but is quite luxurious. If serving this salad for a picnic, store in a cool box until required and pour over the dressing just before serving.







200g asparagus tips, ends trimmed and cut into 5cm lengths
250g
baby plum tomatoes, halved
50g rocket
300g cooked, peeled king prawns

For the dressing:
1 tsp Dijon mustard
2 tsp clear honey
3 tbsp lemon juice
100ml olive oil
Salt and freshly ground black pepper








1: Cook the asparagus in boiling salted water for 4-5 minutes until just tender. Drain and plunge into cold water to prevent it cooking further. Pat dry with kitchen paper.

2: Arrange all the salad ingredients on 4 plates.

3: To make the dressing, put the mustard, honey, oil and seasoning in a bowl and whisk well. Add the lemon juice and whisk until slightly thickened.

4: Pour the dressing over the salad and serve immediately.


Alternatives

If you can’t get hold of king prawns, you could substitute these with large North Atlantic prawns.

As an alternative, try substituting the prawns with 400g cooked smoked chicken breast.

Dragonflygurl
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 Posted: Thu Jun 14th, 2007 02:12 pm

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Jerhume I found out what Rutabaga is.



All about RUTABAGA

Other names: Swede, Swedish turnip 



General Information

Etymology
From the Swedish "rotabagge"

Description
The rutabaga is grown for the bulbous part of its stalk which grows underground.


Once known as "chou de Siam" (Siamese cabbage) in French, the rutabaga grows in cold wet countries. It is a cross between the turnip and kale which originated in Sweden, hence its name.

Nutritional values per 100 g
Calories: 36; Fat: 0.2 g; Water: 87%; Carbohydrates: 8 g; Protein: 1.2 g; Sugars: 7%. Rich in vitamin A and minerals.


Buying swedes
The swede should be nicely shaped, purple at the top, with a narrow smooth crown, a well-defined central taproot and a minimum of secondary roots. It should be unblemished and undamaged.


Beware of buying swedes that are very light in weight: they may be hollow. Choose young vegetables. Larger ones can be tough and fibrous and have a stronger taste.

Storage
Keep in a cool, dark place. Refrigerate for up to 10 days. As they age, swedes dry out and soften.


Cooking tips
Scrape and peel swedes. Cut in long slices or in quarters and boil in lightly salted water until tender. Drain, reserving the cooking liquid to use in puréeing them, or as the base for a sauce.


Even though often confused with the turnip, the swede requires almost twice as long a cooking time.

Remove the core if it is brownish (caused by a lack of boron in the soil.) If its flavour is too strong, first blanch for 10 minutes. Drain and continue cooking in fresh water.

Suggestions
Begin caramelizing some butter and honey. Deglaze with two tablespoons of water. Add swedes sliced 3 mm thick and cook, stirring occasionally. Season with salt and pepper. Serve with roast duck.


Stuffed - Blanch a swede for 10 minutes and stuff it with a mixture of potato and turnip pulp, mushroom duxelles or homestyle stuffing.

Swedes will enliven stews that are a bit bland.

As "French fries": their high sugar content will caramelize in hot oil.

Soup - cook swede in chicken stock with a few potatoes. Purée in a blender.

Add cream and a drizzle of maple syrup.

Worldwide Gourmet
Finland - purée swedes with cream, bread crumbs, molasses, beaten egg, cinnamon, nutmeg and some of their cooking liquid. Pour into a baking dish. Cover with bread crumbs and dot with butter. Place in the oven.


Norway - Purée equal parts of swede and potato with salt, pepper, milk, some cooking liquid and a big pinch of sugar. Serve drizzled with melted butter.

Sweden - Peel and dice the swedes. Cook with a very small amount of water, honey, salt and pepper.

Go here for a recipe for it, http://www.theworldwidegourmet.com/?action=recette_show&id=864&lg=en


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