You have arrived in the LEXXVERSE where the spirit of Lexx lives on. Home


Deciphering the LEXX - Part I
 Moderated by: Ketana, CheshireKat, aeonflux  

New Topic

Reply

Print
AuthorPost
The Red Plague
Heretic


Joined: Mon Apr 6th, 2009
Location: Daugavpils, Latvia
Posts: 3
Status:  Offline
Mana: 
 Posted: Tue Apr 14th, 2009 02:12 am

Quote

Reply
As a starting point of my narration I'd like to present my personal account of getting introduced to this masterpiece of cosmic art, which I consider to be quite essential in providing better understanding of the follow-up analysis of the show. I got to know to LEXX the first time when I was a high school student. I was about 16 that time. If I'm not mistaken it was somewhere around October-November 1998 when one of Russian TV-channels available here began broadcasting these series. They were airing the first two seasons and the second one was shown simultaneously with the original release dates. Before that I was a great "Babylon 5" fan, which was also aired few months earlier on the same channel. And I was really convinced that so far nothing could beat the genius of Michael Straczynsky. But the "LEXX" forever changed this opinion of mine taking my vision of what a real sci-fi should be like to a brand new level. However, that wasn't a love at first sight. My first stage of perception was like "what's that shit?". After technological and political sophistication of Babylon with its complex diplomatic twists, tangled intrigues and plots and profound philosophical and ethical subtext hidden behind almost every story demonstrated Paul Donovan's creation seemed nothing more but a freak circus surrounded by some disturbingly phantasmagoric settings. This first impression was about to discourage me from further watching of the show, but surprisingly to myself something made me get involved with the movie as the plot progressed. At first I wasn't aware of the cause, which triggered my obsession with "LEXX" but as I grew older and got to know myself better I finally figured out what it was. I was unconsciously lured by the BIZZARE nature of the show, which was so close to my own nature being still obscure to me at that tender time of my life. It fed my nascent hunger for all the mad and perverted things I've been for in this world. It was a perfectly arranged cocktail of original and gripping storyline, twisted sexuality and disturbing themes of violence and personal depravity covered by a thin layer of exquisite and sarcastic humor. It gave me more than I needed at that time - the blood-chilling character of tortures and executions displayed, awesome and surrealistic settings and decadent and deeply corrupted characters (my personal favourites among the others - the cyberfucker Schlemmi from "Luvliner", a deeply submissive slave Veegle from "Mantrid" and a sweet couple of gay BDSM mercenaries from "Giga Shadow"). I couldn't help myself but admiring each dirty gesture or saying expressed in the movie, each action of brutality and wild patterns of sexual conduct occuring in the characters' relationship as well as delicate quotations uttered by the poetman. And, of course, above all I was fascinated by "Stan the Man" Tweedle - a grotesque personality, which hardly ever could have fitted the traditional image of sci-fi protagonists. Just compare this guy to a commander of "Babylon 5" - the brave defender of human rights and a fearless charismatic leader John Sheriddan and you'll get the carricature right at your hand! Stanley had been a mockery of a commonly accepted icon of the interstellar superhero but at the same he had never fallen so pathetic to make the viewers feel a kind of repulsion towards him. And in this sense both mr. Downey and the director made a great job - you should admit at least that it's not easy enough to keep some sort of secret charm while remaining as inperfect as possible over the four seasons! Well, anyway, the debates about this may go on forever..

So, that's how I turned into a lexxian.



____________________
УСТРОЙ СО МНОЮ СВАЛЬНЫЙ ГРЕХ!!
Be_You_
Heretic


Joined: Wed Feb 18th, 2009
Location: San Francisco Bay, California USA
Posts: 342
Status:  Offline
Mana: 
 Posted: Tue Apr 14th, 2009 07:55 pm

Quote

Reply
Hey RP,

I started scifi watching Star Trek and then got into reading "hard" sci-fi (or speculative fiction) by authors such as Robert Heinlein and learned to "turn up my nose" at the "space opera" genre. I never liked Babylon 5 or Stargate because of that and especially because of the formulaic protagonists you mention. (I prefer the hero James Bond in the Ian Fleming novels over the characterizations in the movies because in the novels, 007 is eminently fallible and often only survives because he's damn lucky.)

Lexx grabbed my attention because of the lovely Xenia Seeburg and her magnificent - and similarly scantily-dressed - female costars when I first saw season 2 in reruns in 2000, but I was also drawn to the bizzare makeup of the crew and the dark anti-heroes and flawed progenitors.

Some of the things about the show that you mention, particularly the treatment of "deviants" trouble me. One (wo)man's deviance is another (wo)man's good clean fun and most of the problems in the world stem from an egotistic will to condemn and control others. I have discovered that the sci-fi genre tends to be "conservative" or even rightist; for instance, Gene Roddenberry was a Los Angeles cop and many Star Trek episodes have trite good vs. bad schemas. Lexx sometimes seems to fit that overall pattern.
 
The one moment which really struck me was in Season 3 - I think it was Gondola - where Xev, Stan, Prince-as-living-Kai, reborn Schlemmi, and Bunny are riding in a balloon over the molten lake. (Again, I'm not sure this is the episode). Xev is trying to explain "children" to the denizens of Water/Fire which is a concept they are unfamiliar with because they "just wake up." She puts her fingers about a half-inch apart - maybe closer - to signify "when you are small" which struck me as an overt sop to the rightist anti-choice (anti-abortion rights) factions which would preclude the right of a woman to terminate a pregnancy even in the first trimester.

The fact that "deviants" always seem to be painted in a bad light also is a disquieting; why are the gay men sewing the balloons in Girltown condemned to Fire if that is not an overt value judgement on the part of the shows creators?

Am I taking it all too seriously?

The Red Plague
Heretic


Joined: Mon Apr 6th, 2009
Location: Daugavpils, Latvia
Posts: 3
Status:  Offline
Mana: 
 Posted: Wed Apr 15th, 2009 12:26 pm

Quote

Reply
Hello, BY!

Thank you for your voluminous and intellectual response to my post. I derived much pleasure watching through it and had to really mobilize some of my dormant thinking centres to grasp the meaning of some things you expressed there. So, you stated that the show sometimes follows the pattern of moralistic concepts. I cannot deny that since I think that Mr. Donovan desregarding the fact how bizzare and freaky his own phantasies might be still had in mind that he should comply to at least some conventional norms and trends in order to have his movie aired worldwide and via the variety of mainstream channels, which are available to all kinds of audience. If he would dare to unleash all that stuff and show no compromises in regard to morality and censorship it's quite logical to assume that such kind of "LEXX" would be immediately banned from the bulk of the showcases it's been into and remain somewhere in the underground known only to a very limited portion of fans. And, for sure, if such case had ever happened it would never have reached the TV screens in my land and, probably, I would have been unaware of it even today. In other words, that's a simple matter of acceptance. The more your thinking differs from the standard social dogmas of what life within it should be like the less you get chances to push your ideology and visions forward to a wider publicity. Let's say I really doubt that the videos of such scandalous and hard-line brutal bands like "Cannibal Corpse" or "Deicide" are regularly broadcast on popular music channels. As I know earlier it was possible to see them only on "Headbanger's Ball" - a special application of MTV, which had always been aired quite late, perhaps, to keep the schoolchildren from going crazy and turning into psychotic killers and satanists.

Anyway, the outlook of the majority of people residing here in Latvia is still used to be considerably conservative. As for the residents of the state, which was a former member of the Soviet Union with its puritanic labouristic morality that got imposed on its every citizen since the very first day of his life, for many people here the show had been a real cultural shock. And still it was back into 1998 - only seven years since the long-awaited independence had been set in, the time when only few things were a bit different from the Old Order. My family had a very negative impression of the show calling it a heresy and delirious rabies of the brain. For one reason they were even scared that it might badly affect my aesthetic perception of the art on the whole but still I took my chances to have it watched till the end (however, these were only the first two seasons).

So I believe Mr. Donovan and the crew were still as challenging as they might be within the framework of commercial television.



____________________
УСТРОЙ СО МНОЮ СВАЛЬНЫЙ ГРЕХ!!
Be_You_
Heretic


Joined: Wed Feb 18th, 2009
Location: San Francisco Bay, California USA
Posts: 342
Status:  Offline
Mana: 
 Posted: Sat Apr 18th, 2009 08:44 pm

Quote

Reply
There is a great deal of truth to your analysis, and it is only sensible for television producers to self-censor themselves - even when they set-out to provoke thought and break from norms - if they would otherwise cross limits which would preclude the distribution of their work.

That said, there's another means of analysis I associated with the selection of newspaper and newsmagazine editors (such as Thomas Evans of Newsweek) years before I ever saw Lexx and which I hesitate to elucidate here because in some sense it can be construed as an ad-hominem attack on the creators of Lexx, whom I can't help but admire because the show is one of my favorites of all time. And anyhow, I only have an outsider’s knowledge of the people or situations involved.

But to some degree what is seen in mass media is limited by who is put in position to produce it in the first place.

Bands such as "Cannibal Corpse" and "Deicide" may be invisible on popular music channels not because those who produce those channels are censoring themselves, but because those producers have already been selected to know what is "appropriate." This too may be justified; I don't think the broadcast of a romance or cooking show produced by a Jeffrey Dahmer is desirable. (Cannibalism could possibly be justified but not when associated with murder-for-pleasure.)

As for morality plays, those are an indispensable part of literature. I only object when the morality plays are contrived in support a failing paradigm of power - something that Lexx can't, on balance, be accused of.

One such was in IWHS, when His Divine Shadow instructs his lieutenant security chief to assassinate her boss:

Chief: "I worship His Divine Shad ... Pfzzt!"
Look at the developing smile of smug satisfaction on her face as she realizes that she has now gotten herself a promotion - and her visceral (or was it sexual?) enjoyment is obvious!
HDS: "Now shoot yourself."
Lieut: "M - m - m - myself?"

One of my favorite scenes!

I can well imagine how many would see Lexx as "delerious rabies of the brain" but the scene I refered to previously was the only one which shocked me, and that was in season 3, so I don't think it is credible to suggest it was included to balance the weirdness in previous episodes.

His divine Shadow
Heretic


Joined: Wed Dec 20th, 2006
Location: Edmonton, Alberta Canada
Posts: 17
Status:  Offline
Mana: 
 Posted: Mon May 4th, 2009 05:46 pm

Quote

Reply
Interesting talk guys, I think the whole concept of the show, with the overall concept of good vs evil was well depicted.

What first got me interested in the Lexx was that I was watching it and thought, look at those cheesy sets. With all the tech, I thought man why would I like a show like that. Then after watching a couple of episodes, I thought man the story is totally fucking cool. The space scenes were very high tech though and I enjoyed them thoroughly.

However, some of the more depraved sexual scenes like the Luvliner one, the scene where 790 gets a male body, Xev getting lucky with all the virgins, all these where to demonstrate that a lot of human actions are sexually motivated. Kind of like the gimp scene in Pulp fiction. However, it doesn't necessarily mean that people that do this type of stuff are evil, they are just very left of center.

To me one of the most shocking scenes where the ones where people were getting grinded up to feed the Lexx and also the Giga shadow. They are after all an insect culture, and just like the movie "Mimic", insects will do whatever they have to make the colonie survive and prosper.

I think the coolest scenes though, were when we could see the insect essence entering and leaving the human hosts, totally creeepy and interesting at the same time.

I don't think we will ever see another series like the Lexx, ever!!!!



____________________
On your knees.
Angel
Divine Executioner


Joined: Tue Oct 24th, 2006
Location: Keeping Kool With Kai...
Posts: 11433
Status:  Offline
Mana: 
 Posted: Mon May 4th, 2009 06:51 pm

Quote

Reply
His divine Shadow wrote: I think the coolest scenes though, were when we could see the insect essence entering and leaving the human hosts, totally creeepy and interesting at the same time.

I don't think we will ever see another series like the Lexx, ever!!!!

I don't know if you watch Supernatural or not, but the black insect essence when it leaves a body and enters another host in Lexx, reminds me so much of when a demon enters and leaves a human on Supernatural, same black fog/smoke.



____________________
The dead do not squeeze and please....
Be_You_
Heretic


Joined: Wed Feb 18th, 2009
Location: San Francisco Bay, California USA
Posts: 342
Status:  Offline
Mana: 
 Posted: Wed May 6th, 2009 12:38 am

Quote

Reply
His divine Shadow wrote:it doesn't necessarily mean that people that do this type of stuff are evil, they are just very left of center.I suspect you're using the designation "left of center" in the sense of being open and honest.

hisdivinemeadow
Heretic
 

Joined: Thu Jan 20th, 2011
Location:  
Posts: 3
Status:  Offline
Mana: 
 Posted: Thu Jan 20th, 2011 09:34 am

Quote

Reply
Hi Everybody, new member here.

I watched the show back in the ninties just because it was on, but it always stuck in my head. I had fond memories of season three, and "Brigadoom" in particular. I finally saw it on dvd at HMV (yes I am lazy) so I bought all 4 seasons. I love it.
However, while facinated by the morality play and philosophy of it all (Type 13 Planet about to be destroyed by the Higgs-Boson - awesome), there is one thing that bothers me.
Not once, but twice the writers insinuate that there may be something "bad" about male homosexuality. This is evidenced in the "girls" manning the sewing machines in "Girltown" who repeatedly insist that they do not deserve to be on fire as they are not mean spirited or destructive. This could be argued as an anomoly of Fire and Water, as "Fifi" ("Gametown" on) clearly does not belong on water.
It is the second instance that I find puzzling. The episode "Xevivor" features the character "Farley" (a reincarnation of "Fifi" who in turn was "Schlemi" from "Luvliner"). At any rate, during this episode Farley is plagued by doubts about his sexuality, and is convinced that this is because of misdeeds in his past. If I recal correctly, noone says anything to counter this conclusion.
I just wonder if a there is a little more of a right wing attitude peaking through there.

hisdivinemeadow
Heretic
 

Joined: Thu Jan 20th, 2011
Location:  
Posts: 3
Status:  Offline
Mana: 
 Posted: Thu Jan 20th, 2011 10:45 am

Quote

Reply
On further reflection, I think labeling something "right wing" in reference to Lexx is missing the point somewhat. To me all the writers ever did was raise questions.

Perhaps then their questions about homesexuality were more presumptious than most.

Angel
Divine Executioner


Joined: Tue Oct 24th, 2006
Location: Keeping Kool With Kai...
Posts: 11433
Status:  Offline
Mana: 
 Posted: Thu Jan 20th, 2011 11:20 am

Quote

Reply
Or perhaps it was their sense of humor and the fact that Lexx was laced with inconsistencies.. Welcome to Lexxverse.



____________________
The dead do not squeeze and please....
mayaXXX
Divine Executioner


Joined: Tue Oct 24th, 2006
Location: Dark Zone, Naturally
Posts: 2465
Status:  Offline
Mana: 
 Posted: Thu Jan 20th, 2011 05:19 pm

Quote

Reply

At the time that Lexx was on TV,  (1996 on), none of the other Scifi shows were addressing any controversial subject matter when it came to sex. Jeff Hirschfield, Lex Giggeroff and Paul Donovan are all extremely funny guys, and decided to make sure their warped senses of humour were presented in a way that was publicly acceptable. The TV show  poked fun at lots of other subject matter as well, US politics, reality TV shows, etc, so when it came down to the homo-erotic subtones of some of the episodes, it was just a matter of the Beans (the Human Beans, as they were called) to push the envelope of what they could get away with on TV, while thumbing their noses to the television establishment. Good for them, I say.

:bouncebig:



____________________
"Blah blah blah, Vampire Emergency, Blah..."
IT'S OFFICIAL
hisdivinemeadow
Heretic
 

Joined: Thu Jan 20th, 2011
Location:  
Posts: 3
Status:  Offline
Mana: 
 Posted: Fri Jan 21st, 2011 04:27 am

Quote

Reply
Thanks, glad to be here.

Ya it's entirely possible that I'm reading too much into it. It is fun to do that though, there just seems to be this wacky but plauzible philosophy that runs underneath it all.

It's hard to explain, but much like some of my other favorite sci-fi, Lexx seems like an analogy of the inconsistencies and unknowns of our existence. It takes a shot at opening some of the cracks in the sidewalk and in it we find a parallel universe that may or may not have existed.

The beans, as you say, were definitely having fun while they did it, but to me, Lexx at its best touches on the sublime.


 Current time is 04:53 pm


Quick Reply
Enter your quick reply:



Black_metal theme exclusively by: WowBB Theme Mall
Powered by WowBB 1.7 - Copyright © 2003-2006 Aycan Gulez
SciFi Updates